Category Archives: Examples

Abstract Grid Composition

14_UWS_GD310_PRO3PT1_Hierarchy_grid_575pi_01

| Ten Compositions Layered and Stacked

14_UWS_GD310_PRO3PT1_Hierarchy-grid_550pi

| Ten Compositions Sequential Display


Project Three — Part One
Abstract Grid Composition: Hierarchy Study

Description:
Create a series of compositions with placeholder text. Use the grid to determine the potential placement of a graphic/image and  text. Create dynamically divergent compositions. Use any type variety within the Univers family. Use size and scale change to your advantage.

Project Requirements:
Each series of compositions will start with a 10″ x 10″ composition in InDesign. Each set of compositions will exclusively use the type family LT–Adobe Univers (provided on R2•D2)

You must also specify type, which appears to represent three (3) layers of typographic hierarchy. Use placeholder text unless you wish to add “content” to a large display type where you copy edit your own text.

GRID COMPOSITION

Objectives:

  • Examine the diversity and versatility of a series of  grid structures
  • Consider the totality of the composition when text and image are aligned to a grid
  • Using false, or placeholder texts, create and examine subtle hierarchy possibilities in relation to three (3) congruent levels of text
  • Keep the designs and compositional concepts simple
  • Look at the possible compositions of text and image
  • Create a single PDF file with a full collection of your ten (10) compositions

See the attached PDF files of ten (10) sample compositions.
Each uses:

  • Univers Type Family
  • Conventional typographic alignments [left, right, centered]
  • Each has three (3) layers of typographic hierarchy
  • 50% (grey/black) stand-in for images
  • “Fill with placeholder text” – each composition and paragraph sample uses a different fill
  • Several equally divided grids; 7×7, 9×9, 12×12 of columns and rows
  • Do not save with ‘visible guides’ turn on; samples show how each is organized

Sample Files: Ten Compositions [PDF]

Project Three: Part One – without ‘visble guides + grids’
Project Three: Hierarchy Grid – with ‘visible guides’

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Spring DES220 Lesson Two Album Covers

DES220 Introduction to 2–D Digital Imaging

Lesson Two

DESCRIPTION —
Photoshop Image Manipulation
Randomized Search: Album Covers

Bone Creek

  • Bone Creek — This Is The Real Deal

SP14_DES220_LES_02_album_dallas-hood

  • Dallas Hood — Wouldn’t Seem So Wonderful At All

SP14_DES220_LES_02_album_mr-medicine

  • Mr. Medicine — Good Sense & Reason

SP14_DES220_LES_02_album_richard-breneham

  • Richard Baneham — Desolating the Country
  1. A Young Axe
  2. Reparation Without Satisfaction
  3. A Peacefully Meditative Gnu
  4. Objectionable and Oppressive
  5. Each Is All Three
Image Resources:

‪Bone Creek‬
© All rights reserved by Red Beetle

Mr. Medicine‬
© All rights reserved by rocket2722
© All rights reserved by Cutter55

Richard Baneham
© All rights reserved by Trevor Kemp
© Some rights reserved by mollyblock
© All rights reserved by xperiane (Extremely Ultimately busy)

•••  —  —  —  •••

Assignment Description/Process

ASSIGNMENT: several years ago, there was a album cover artwork generation phenomena on Facebook.

Lesson Two: Random Album Covers project brief

To Do This —

  1. Go to Wikipedia. Hit “random” or  —
click http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Special:Random

    The first random Wikipedia article you get is the name of your band.
  2. Go to Quotations Page and select “random quotations” or  —
click http://www.quotationspage.com/random.php3

    The last four or five words of the very last quote on the page is the title of your first album.
  3. Go to Flickr and click on “explore the last seven days” or  —
click http://www.flickr.com/explore/interesting/7days

    Third picture, no matter what it is, will be your album cover.
  • Use Photoshop to put it all together, including the typography.
  • Repeat this process three (3) times to generate three different album concepts
— The second time you MUST compose two (2) images into your cover design; the third, you must find three (3) images to collage into your album concept.This is a total of six (6) images.

You also must look through, and search three resources for free typeface.
Links: da Font | Lost Type Co-op | Chank Fonts • FREE

Full Set(s) of Album Covers

Fig. 05**

Resolution 72ppi

Resolution and pixel depth

Fig. 01; 72 dpi, w: 180pxl h: 180pxl, w: 2.5” h: 2.5”, Res: 72ppi

Fig. 02; 150 dpi, w: 350pxl h: 350pxl, w: 2.5” h: 2.5”, Res: 150ppi

Fig. 03; 300 dpi, w: 750pxl h: 750pxl, w: 2.5” h: 2.5”, Res: 300ppi

Fig. 04; 1200 dpi, w: 500pxl h: 500pxl, w: 7.0” h: 7.0”, Res: 72ppi

Each image was sub-sampled (resized), up and/or down to WEB standards; each forced to w: 500ppi h: 500ppi.

Note: examine the size variation and amount of pixel resolution distortion. The graphics were the same exact size, starting with the larger resolution (300 dpi) in each of the three studies.

* Fig. 04 was exported from Adobe Illustrator as a 72dpi jpeg file. Save for web and devices… resized to 500×500. Fig. 04 shows the letterform “O” as editable font, outlined font, and its vector control points.
** Fig. 05 depicts all four layers combined, multiplyed, and colored upon each artwork file.

Hipster Logo Design Guide

TRENDY, VINTAGE INSPIRED ARTISINAL LOGO:

Design Guide, Design, and implementation

Project One Hipster Logo Project Brief

SIX EASY STEPS

  • No Concept Necessary!
  • Follow the Hipster Logo Design Guide to create a simple and cliché logo. Irony is a necessary part of this assignment. The cliché can be used to your advantage, or lead to the demise of a good logo concept. This project is truly a way to warm up and think about the concept of a design cliché.

Hipster Logo Design Guide

Project One —SIX EASY STEPS

No Concept Necessary!

Follow the Hipster Logo Design Guide to create a simple and cliché logo. Irony is a necessary part of this assignment. The cliché can be used to your advantage, or lead to the demise of  a good logo concept. This project is truly a way to warm up and think about the concept of a design cliché.

Step 1: Choose a badge
The perfect shape for a patch, stamp, or temporary tattoo.
Example:

  • The simple circle
  • The seal (scalloped edge) of approval
  • The merit badge

Step 2: Let’s decorate!
Time to add some fun design elements to add visual texture.

  • Grab an “X”, maybe some arrows! How about a banner?
  • You’ll need some fun icons. Don’t worry if they don’t pertain to your business, this is all about a lifestyle.

Step 3: Use some key words
Because your product is authentic,  locally sourced, and handcrafted.
Use vintage jargon like:

  • Artisinal
  • Provisions
  • Hand Crafted
  • Purveyors
  • Authentic
  • Supplies
  • Dry goods
  • Use alternate rhetoric or D.I.Y.  “design” words such as:
  • Graphic Artist
  • Illustrator
  • Hand Lettering
  • Layout
  • Desktop Publisher
  • Computer Graphics

Step 4: SUPER IMPORTANT!
Extra Info. Gotta make sure people know it’s legit. The more the better.
Extras such as:

  • Found or appropriated
  • REG.
  • MFG
  • Trade Mark
  • Estd.
  • Since
  • U.S.A.
  • 2013
  • Co.
  • Circa

Step 5: ADD the Name
Don’t spend time searching through countless fonts, just choose from the selection below.

  • Wisdom Script —
    So scripty, and it’s “free!” — Lost Type
  • FUTURA BOLD —
    It’s the Wes Anderson font. Designed by Paul Renner, 1927.
  • Brothers —
    For that rugged, indie, pioneering feel
    Offered by Emigré, Designed by John Downer in 1999.

Step 6: Implement
Make a Rubber Stamp: pick any color, as long as it’s red or black. Grab some kraft paper and stamp away.

Find some vintage photographs or images, which your design can be applied; easel, artboard, render in pen & ink, artist canvas, random studio images (not yours of course, this is about image)

Step 7: and repeat…
Follow the process to the best of your ability; create two total designs. Try to make each design very different using the same criteria and ground rules.
Create a third alternate design that enhances the process, and goes beyond the stereotype; use any other design, material, typefaces. We will compare and access the three designs.

[See the attached zipped font files]

Blazenhoff, Rusty. “The Hipster Logo Design Guide on How To Create an Artisanal Logo.” Laughing Squid. Design Taxi, 31 July 2013. Web. 25 Aug. 2013. The Hipster Logo Design Guide” by San Francisco-based designer Tim Delger, via DesignTAXI.
ALSO: look at The Noun Project, http://thenounproject.com/

Twelfth Anniversary

09111213 Memorial

09111213 Memorial

Collaboration avec les photographes Thibault Chamot-Guzzo et Viktor Shekularatz. Sont combinés leurs clichés présentant leurs quotidiens à New Yor et de graphismes créés en fonction des ambiances. La suite à venir.

Through a recent image search examining the theme of design cliché I came across this stunning series of collaborative photograph and typographic combinations highlighting various boroughs of New York. For a single day I was consumed with the numeric sequence 09•11•12•13, representing the twelfth anniversary of nine-eleven in two-thousand thirteen.

I gathered this set of designs to cycle and project upon the hand drawn numerals 9111213 lettered on a chalk board to memorialize the Twelfth Anniversary of 911. I paired the projection and found visual presentation with I Love New York from Madonna’s Confessions on the Dance Floor, circa 2005.

It remains my sole intention to promote the work of Say What Studio as an educational presentation to my Graphic Design One students at UW–Stout. I sought no approval from Say What, or Madonna; but thank them both for their contributions.

•••

Say What
Nathalie Kapagiannidi and Benoit Berger
Graphic Design Studio
12 rue Ferdinand Duval
75004 Paris
Kapagiannidi, Nathalie, and Benoit Berger. “Say What Studio – In Situ.” Typographie 2013. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Sept. 2013. Collaboration avec les photographes Thibault Chamot-Guzzo et Viktor Shekularatz. Sont combinés leurs clichés présentant leurs quotidiens à New Yor et de graphismes créés en fonction des ambiances. La suite à venir.

Disunion

Project: 4 Disunion

GRIDS: Systems and Structure

System and Structure Project

Disunion Project Brief

Now that we’ve had a chance to play with how a grid can work — how type can interact with it, how content can be organized within it — we’re going to increase the complexity of our problem. For the next phase of this project we’re going to design book spreads using a similar grid, but with more diverse content and hierarchy, extended across multiple pages. We’ll start by designing eight pages but in the end, we’ll add four more for a cover and back cover. We’ll wind up with a small sales BLAD for a book called Disunion about the Civil War.

Our text content will be two stories from the New York Times series about the 150th anniversary of the civil war and our images come from the Library of Congress. We’ll all be using very specific style sheets and page grids, but again I have no doubt we’ll see a great deal of variability in the outcomes. You will be the image editor, you will determine the rhythm pacing, you will design the structure of the pages.

To get started, everyone will make the following InDesign document:

  • 
Page size = 8” x 8”
  • Set your unit rulers to Points in your preferences

Set the following parameters for 
your master page:

  • Outside margin = 24 pt., all sides
  • 12 columns, 12 pt. gutter
  • 9 horizontal guides (rows) with, 12 pt. gutters

Set up two style sheets:

  1. “Body” = 10 pt. Akzidenz Grotesk BQ regular with 12 pt. leading
  2. “Captions” = 7 pt. Akzidenz Grotesk BQ regular with 8 pt. leading

Download all the content (and font!) from R2•D2. Set up your file. Read the stories. 
Look at the images. Come to class on Monday ready to work with three (3) files prepared with all of the content placed in them.

This Week: Bring three (3) designs to class, each trimmed to the edge. Refine one design to temporarily saddle stitch before we go on to further revisions and cover designs.

• • •

Disunion Cover Design
Disunion Interior Sample w- Grid

DESEDU Disunion Text File

Design Culture Now

Design Culture Now

Bodega Typeface created on an iPad using iFontMaker; exported as a True Type font format.

Hand drawn “DE•SIGN” and “Cooper – Hewitt…” hand-lettering was drawn and generated on an iPad using the Made With Paper — 53 iPad App.
|

A Critical Academic Response

Many design professors and faculty have begun implementing a version of Ellen Lupton’s Design Culture Now poster assignment into GD1, GD2, or Typography classes across the globe. This overwhelming acceptance of this project has created a small online community. Almost a right of passage, a Google search for Design Culture Now Poster recalls hundreds of student posters. The collection is a small snapshot into the current need for design curriculum to adapt, change, and address contemporary design issues and technical attributes.

As a former graduate student of Ellen’s, I readily accept this project and have added it to my GD1 courses for the past several semesters. I have seen an assorted grouping of student designs; some excellent, and others that miss the essential guidelines and typographic criteria for which the project was created.

The National Design Triennial exhibition and catalog of the same name was once a speculative collection of cross-disciplinary designers and their designs in both theory, practice, and application. As indirect result has formed a large micro community of poster designs. These designs can illuminate current design trends, design education, and current events circulating the international design community.

Student designs vary greatly, from well developed visual design concepts, to poorly reactive, non-observant non articulated misaligned solutions. Seeing the larger community of DCN poster design I see my teaching notes are not unlike others. The uniqueness of this poster community allows distant observation for both the students and faculty. The diversity allows students to witness other attempts, used in a larger discussion can help make their own posters more articulate and considered. The DCN poster project is an ever specific, minute micro study, into current events of design history. The larger collection is acting like a time capsule for contemporary design education practice.

Project: 5
Text, image, hierarchy, impact

DCN POSTER DESIGN

Time to make a poster! Again, we turn to Ms. Lupton
(with some modifications):

Create a poster for a lecture series about contemporary design.

Carefully consider the typographic hierarchy of the information presented. A viewer should be able to easily understand the calendar of events and quickly learn who the main speakers are. The poster must also convey the excitement of contemporary design to an audience of designers and students. The information itself must constitute the “imagery” of the poster.

Your posters should show a significant rigorous study of potential typographic solutions. Think of the past projects leading up to this; how does hierarchy, type size and style, and the use of a grid organize information. What relationships can you create?

Details:

Size: 18” x 24”

  • Your poster must be type dominant. You may use colors, shapes, and lines as well as any supplemental text.
  • Any secondary imagery such as a collage, illustration or photograph must be created by you. No outside found/stolen/borrowed imagery may be used.
  • You must use a grid to organize your design. The grid is up to you. Consider how the number of columns and rows may organize and structure your content.

Ideation—first draft of designs. You must create three poster concepts. Present your three designs reduced to fit an 11” x 17” (including crop marks). Each of your three concepts must be printed, cut, and trimmed and prepared before class begins. Unfinished posters will not be accepted for critique.

:::

RESOURCES:

Hierarchy Studies

Project Three Part Two

Description:

Create a series of compositions with placeholder text. Use the grid
to determine the potential placement of a graphic/image and
text. Create dynamically divergent compositions. Use any type
variety within the Univers family. Use size and scale change to
your advantage.

Project Requirements:

  • Each series of compositions will start with a 10″ x 10″
    composition in InDesign.
  • Each set of compositions will exclusively use the type family LT–Adobe Univers
  • You must also specify type, which appears to represent three (3) layers of hierarchy.
  • Use placeholder text unless you wish to add “content” to
    a large display type where you copy edit your own text.
  • Page Division: seven (7) rows and seven (7) columns.
Create 1o compositions using the following page criteria:

Page/Document Requirements:

  • Document Size: 10″ x 10″
  • Non facing pages: ~
  • Number of pages: 10
  • Create an equal number of guides (H/V) dividing the page; 7/7, 6/6, 10/10 Start with 7 columns, 7 rows.
  • Base the columns and rows according to the page .125″ gutter.
  • NO page margins

Use modules to produce organizational hierarchy compositions between place holder text, set accordingly; box(s) indicating photo(s) placement {use a tinted boxes to indicate photo placement; 50% blue/grey} 13_GD1_PRO3P2_Composition_1 13_GD1_PRO3P2_Composition_2 13_GD1_PRO3P2_Composition_3 13_GD1_PRO3P2_Composition_4

Objectives:

  • Examine the diversity and versatility of a series of  grid structures
  • Examine subtle hierarchy possibilities in relation to three congruent sets of text
  • Look at the possible compositions of text and image, examine:
  • Size relationship
  • Contrast
  • Pattern
  • Texture
  • Single vs. multiple
  • Large vs. Small
  • Consider the totality of the composition when text and image are aligned to a grid

Create a PDF file with a full collection of your compositions

::

Definitions

Grid — def.
A grid is a network of lines. It is a tool for generating form, arranging images, and organizing, information. The grid can work quietly in the background, or it can assert itself as an active element. The grid becomes visible as objects come into alignment with it. Some designers use grids in a strict, absolute way, while others see them as a starting point in an evolving process.

In the design of printed matter, guidelines help the designer align elements in relation to each other. Consistent margins and columns create an underlying structure that unifies a document and makes the layout process more efficient.
A well-made grid encourages the designer to vary the scale and placement of elements without relying wholly on arbitrary judgements. The grid offers a rationale and a starting point for each composition, converting a blank area into a structured field.

Grids are part of modern urbanism and architecture. The facades of many glass high rises and other modern buildings consist of uniform ribbons of metal and glass that wrap the building’s volume in a continuous skin. The street grids used in many modern cities around the globe promote circulation among neighborhoods and the flow of traffic, in contrast with the suburban cul-de-sac, a dead-end road that keeps neighborhoods closed off and private.
The grid imparts a similarly democratic character to the printed page. By making space into numerous equal units, the grid makes the entire page available for use; the edges become as important as the center. Grids help designers create active, asymmetrical compositions in place of static, centered ones. By breaking down space into smaller units, grids encourage designers to leave some areas open rather than filling up the whole page.

Hierarchy — def.
Hierarchy is the order of importance within a social group (such as the regiments of an army) or in a body of text (such as the sections and subsections of a book). Hierarchical order exists in nearly everything we know, including the family unit, the workplace, politics, and religion. Indeed, the ranking of order defines who we are as a culture.

Hierarchy is expressed through naming systems: general, colonel, corporal, private, and so on. Hierarchy is also conveyed visually, through variations in scale, value, color, spacing, placement, and other signals.

Like fashion, graphic design cycles through periods of structure and chaos, ornament and austerity. A designer’s approach to visual hierarchy reflects his or her personal style, methodology, and training as well as the zeitgeist of the period. Hierarchy can be simple or complex, rigorous or loose, flat or highly articulated. Regardless of approach, hierarchy employs clear marks of separation to signal a change from one level to another. As in music, the ability to articulate variation in tone, pitch, and melody in design requires careful delineation.
In interaction design, menus,texts, and images can be given visual order through placement and consistent styling, but the user often controls the order in which information is accessed. Unlike a linear book, interactive spaces feature multiple links ans navigation options. Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) articulate the structure of a document separately from its presentation so that information can be automatically reconfigured for different output devices, from desktop computer screens to mobile phones, PDAs, kiosks, and more. A different visual hierarchy might be used in each instance.

The average computer desktop supports a complex hierarchy of icons, applications, folders, menus, images, and palettes–empowering users, as never before, to arrange, access, edit, and order vast amounts of information–all managed through a flexible hierarchy controlled and customized by the user.
As technology allows ever greater access to information, the ability of the designer to distill and make sense of the data glut gains increasing value.

Rhythm & Balance — def.
Balance is a fundamental human condition: we require physical balance to stand upright and walk; we seek balance among the many facets of our personal and professional lives; the world struggles for balance of power.

In design, balance anchors and activates elements in space. Relationships among elements on the page or screen remind us of physical relationships. Visual balance occurs when the weight of one or more things is distributed evenly or proportionately in space. Like arranging furniture in a room, we move components around until the balance of form and space feels right. Large objects are a counterpoint to smaller ones; dark objects to lighter ones.

A symmetrical design is inherently stable. Yet balance need not be static. A tightrope walker achieves balance while traversing a precarious line in space, continually shifting her weight while staying in motion.

Designers employ contrasting size, texture, value, color, and shape to offset or emphasize the weight of an object and achieve the acrobat’s dynamic sense of balance.

Rhythm is a strong, regular, repeated pattern: the beating of drums, the patter of rain, the falling of footsteps. Speech, music, and dance all employ rhythm to express form over time. Designers use rhythm to construct single images as well as to create books, magazines, and motion graphics that have duration and sequence. Designers seek rhythms that are punctuated with change and variation.

Graphic Design The New Basics – grid
Graphic Design The New Basics – hierarchy

Graphic Design The New Basics – rhythm + balance

::

Text acquired from: Design Observer web log and visual archive.

GD1 Grid and Hierarchy Demo

Type Diseases

Sample File, Spring 2013

COMMON TYPOGRAPHIC DISEASES

Various forms of dysfunction appear among populations exposed to typography for long periods of time. Listed here are a number of frequently observed afflictions.

Typophilia
An excessive attachment to and fascination with the shape of letters, often to the exclusion of other interests and object choices. Typophiliacs usually die penniless and alone.

Typophobia
The irrational dislike of letterforms, often marked by a preference for icons, dingbats, and—in fatal cases—bullets and daggers. The fears of the typophobe can often be quieted (but not cured) by steady doses of Helvetica and Times Roman.

Typochondria
A persistent anxiety that one has selected the wrong typeface. This condition is often paired with okd (optical kerning disorder), the need to constantly adjust and readjust the spaces between letters.

Typothermia
The promiscuous refusal to make a lifelong commitment to a single typeface—or even to five or six, as some doctors recommend. The typothermiac is constantly tempted to test drive “hot” new fonts, often without a proper license.

Text from Ellen Lupton, Thinking With Type.